2014 Elite Editing Thesis Write-up Scholarship Winner

Elite Editing is very pleased to announce that the winner of the 2014 Thesis Write-up Scholarship is Lauren Rice. Ms Rice is completing a PhD entitled ‘Understanding the Nature of Temper Outbursts in Prader-Willi Syndrome’ at the Brain and Mind Research Institute, University of Sydney, under the supervision of Professor Stewart Einfeld, Professor Patricia Howlin, Associate Professor Jim Lagopoulos and Dr Kate Woodcock. As part of her scholarship, Ms Rice will receive financial assistance from Elite Editing while writing up her thesis, amounting to $1,000 per fortnight for 12 weeks ($6,000 total, tax free). Elite Editing would like to thank all students who took the time to apply for the scholarship—applications were of an extremely high standard and we wish …

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2013 Elite Editing Thesis Write-up Scholarship Winner

Elite Editing is proud to announce that the winner of the 2013 Thesis Write-up Scholarship is Mr nnaEmeka Chidiebere Meribe. Completing a PhD in Strategic Communications at La Trobe University, under the supervisor of Dr Mary Debrett and Mr John Benson, his thesis is entitled ‘Climate Change Communication and Sustainable Rural Development in Africa: The Nigerian Experience’. Below is nnaEmeka’s abstract, which demonstrates the importance of his research. Abstract The scientific nature of climate change information makes its communication to a lay audience a significant challenge. The challenge is even greater when the audience is mainly illiterate and has no known generally accepted word for the phenomenon. This is largely the situation in many rural areas in Africa, a region …

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Know your enemy—understanding thesis examiners

Abraham Lincoln said ‘the best way to destroy an enemy is to make him a friend’. With respect to thesis examiners, the opposite is closer to the mark—the best way to destroy a friend is to make him or her an enemy. ‘Friend’ and ‘enemy’ are hardly accurate descriptions of the relationship between a candidate and an examiner, but it is fair to say that the majority of thesis examiners want to receive a thesis they can confidently pass and are disappointed if it is not up to standard, rather than being on the ‘attack’ from the outset. Understanding what is expected of examiners and how they approach examination can help you make the process easier for them, and the …

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Do You Suffer from Postgraduate Writers Block?

  How many of the following ‘symptoms’ apply to you right now? •    avoiding getting started with writing •    doing vast amounts of research but not writing it up •    re-drafting written work over and over again but still not being happy with it •    not finishing nearly completed written tasks •    avoiding showing written work to others, especially supervisors •    writing a lot but not in a structured way If some or all of these describe you, then you probably have a case of ‘writers block’ or ‘writing anxiety’. This is a common problem for postgraduate students (and other writers), but why does it happen and, more importantly, what can be done about it? Reasons this is so common …

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Theirs a bare in they’re! Or, just because it sounds write doesn’t mean its bean written the rite weigh.

It doesn’t really matter to a two-year-old watching a certain classic Australian pre-school TV program whether the lyrics of the introductory song read ‘theirs a bare in they’re’, ‘there’s a bare in their’ or ‘there’s a bear in there’ (the correct version); because they all sound the same. English has an abundance of groups of two or more words that have the same pronunciation but different meanings and/or spelling. These are called homophones. They can have the same pronunciation and spelling but different meanings—for example, bear (the animal) and bear (to carry), or have identical pronunciation but different spelling and meanings—for example, bear (the animal) and bare (devoid of covering). Usually there are two or three words that are differently …

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What is the difference between a primary and a secondary source?

In conducting research, you can normally find both primary and secondary sources that can be used. It is important for students to recognise the difference between a primary and a secondary source and know how to use them appropriately. A primary source, as the name implies, is a primary or original document or physical object that was written or created: • at the time the situation under study happens; or • by a person who experienced or witnessed the situation directly or has direct knowledge of it. Examples of primary sources include: • Personal documents: diaries, novels, speeches, letters, personal narratives, interviews, firsthand stories, emails • Documents from research studies: theses, experiment results, reports, data or findings • Original documents: original manuscripts, government documents, maps, …

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